Shifting Five Thoughts for a More Strategic Mindset

Shifting Five Thoughts for a More Strategic Mindset 

Mindy Barker | Barker Associates

We’ve talked about the transition workplaces are going through – from employees resigning in record numbers to the emphasis on employee experiences to the shift in hiring philosophies that prioritize skills over experience. Many employers are working diligently to fill the consequential gaps from those who left and advance those who stayed. And while those who are advancing are eager for the new challenge, the question begging an answer is – do they have the right strategic mindset to successfully transition into their new roles? 

Becoming a strategic leader is about much more than the new title or position. It is about broadening the employee’s perspective from focusing exclusively on one area of expertise to focusing on the organization’s bigger, future picture. A strategic mindset simply cannot have a narrow focus. 

Many avoid the transition from task oriented to strategy oriented when making this move. And it’s not that surprising. Task oriented roles and responsibilities are often more fulfilling in the day-to-day. There is instant gratification in many instances, as checking tasks off a list can be very satisfying. In contrast, you generally do not see the needle moving from a strategic perspective until months or even years later. And, as a society overall, we tend not to favor delayed gratification. However, to successfully make this transition, the strategic, broad, forward-thinking mindset must be embraced wholeheartedly. 

Crossroads to Shift Your Thinking  

For those who are at this crossroads, here are five shifts you can make today to begin having a more strategic mindset: 

1. Think long-term instead of short-term. Instead of looking at your daily list and identifying what tasks you can cross off, think about the organization’s future. Ask yourself: 

What are the possibilities for the future?  

What are the opportunities available?  

Where do we want to be as an organization in one year? What about in five years?  

What can we do today to help us get there? 

2. Think bigger rather than smaller. Think about how the tasks on those daily lists impact the company’s overall strategy. Are the things getting done today aligning to the company’s strategy and future plans? What are the long-term impacts of decisions that are being made and actions being taken today? 

3. Think about opportunities instead of challenges. Some of the most innovative solutions (in any industry) have been brought about during tough times. It is only when we can no longer do the things we’ve always done that we begin to scratch the surface of alternative methods. And often, those alternatives open various new doors of opportunity that would have otherwise remained closed. 

4. Think about future trends, not just the here and now. Join think tanks or find other resources that focus on market research. Ask yourself:  

What is happening the industry?  

What is happening in the marketplace overall?  

How will the events and trends outside of the organization impact the organization’s future? 

5. Think about spending time on strategic planning, not just current responsibilities. This is often the biggest challenge for leaders. As noted in a Harvard Business Review article, “How can you avoid getting overwhelmed by day-to-day tasks that feel so urgent, at the expense of game-changing initiatives that are truly important?”  

Higher-level strategic thinking needs time, space, and dedicated focus. The most effective strategic leaders recognize this and block time on their calendars consistently to devote to strategic planning. 

Cultivating a strategic mindset is crucial for those transitioning into a leadership role. It’s not always easy, but it is attainable by shifting these thoughts. Barker Associates provides strategic guidance to companies of all sizes. We can provide the higher level of strategy your company needs to grow. If you need assistance, or have any other questions, please click here to schedule a 30-minute consultation at a rate of $100.