The 1st Year Audit – Master the Mystery

Does the word audit make your pulse race and put your antiperspirant to the test? Is your monthly financial review fraught with the same level of fear that a trip through the Halloween Hall of Terror brings? If you are a growing company and are required to go through your first audit, it can be scary. The fear of the unknown, worried what may jump out at you as you dig deep to tie out a balance can create real panic.

Rather than sweating bullets and launching into panic mode, think of an audit as your annual wellness check-up and not an attempt to incite fright. If you eat right, exercise and take care of yourself your check-up typically is not cause for concern; but if you’ve consumed one too many lattes or value meals and ignored what you should be doing, the scale and your doc will remind you to pull it together and get back on track for a clean bill of health.

The 1st Year Audit – Master the Mystery
Mindy Barker | Barker Associates

An audit is very similar, but instead of your doctor, it’s your CPA telling you to get your business organized and your financial health on track for a clean opinion on your audit. An audit is beneficial in many ways, but essentially an audit provides peace of mind that your financial statements paint an accurate picture according to Generally Accepted Accounting Principles. This assurance is vital if you are growing and need funding or if the funding you currently receive has compliance requirements.

An audit is important, but it doesn’t have to be as scary as looking into a funhouse mirror. Follow this 5-step process, before your audit begins, it’s like having the answers to the test and will provide you with the clarity needed to minimize anxiety and help you master the mystery behind the first-year audit.

1. Communicate with your CPA.

Your CPA is hired to help you and is not out to get you. Have them set the stage for what you should expect during the audit. Ask them what documents you will need to provide and what tasks you should complete before the audit begins. Talk about the timeline, when will it start, how long will it take? Who will be the primary contact to ask questions and submit documentation? A little fact gathering on the front end will go a long way to help the audit process move along seamlessly.

2. Map out a project plan

Take the information provided during your initial meeting with the audit firm and identify the tasks that need to you will need to complete. Assign the appropriate person to the task and determine a deliverable date. Work with your team to ensure that tasks are appropriately assigned and document any dependencies and concerns that may interfere with the deliverable date.

3. Communicate with your team and launch the project

Project kick-off is essential. A proper kick-off demonstrates leadership supports and identifies the objectives to accomplish as well as risks, assumptions, dependencies, and timeline. Many of the teammates that are responsible for supporting the audit are completely busy doing their “day job” and don’t have a ton of extra time. Communication upfront with clear requirements, expectations, and deadlines will help them to plan appropriately to coordinate the additional work into their schedule so they can work much more effectively.

Clarity is the antidote to anxiety. Effective leaders are clear.

-Marcus Buckingham

4. Get Organized

One of the most frustrating aspects of an audit is related to cost increases. Additional costs arise because the audit team has to do extra work to clean up your mess. Many times, clients can avoid costly increases to their audit bill by ensuring they have all their documents in order. For instance, are your accounts reconciled? Do you have supporting documentation for revenue and payments? What about lease schedules, do the payments tie out and do you have addendums and invoices to support lease and CAM payments? Does your trial balance tie out, and is your general ledger mapped appropriately to your financial statements, including the statement of cash flow? Get organized, make sure your accounts tick and tie and have the appropriate documentation on hand.

5. Review your progress

Schedule regular touchpoints to communicate progress. Think agile. In the IT world during implementation, the team meets for 15 mins each day to give a quick overview of the task they need to complete, progress, and concerns. Short, frequent meetings allow the team to stay in synch, mitigate risks, and provide support along the way. If you know how everyone is progressing, there are fewer surprises, and likely you can head off any significant delays or concerns.

Invest the time to follow the steps. As a former auditor, I’ve come to learn that prepared clients are collaborative, not combative. Their team is happier, well informed, productive, and the result is peace of mind and financial clarity. A little communication, structure, and organization go a long way to help you and your team manage the process and stay on task, bringing you one step closer to a clean bill of health for your business.

Do you need help solving audit mysteries or getting organized? Barker and Associates can help you overcome audit anxiety and set you and your business up for success. We’ve created a Year-End Checklist for Audit Preparation that will help you streamline the process. Click the button below to enter your email and we will send the checklist to you right away via email.

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