Archives

2021’s Great Resignation

2021’s Great Resignation 

Mindy Barker | Barker Associates

We are all fully aware of how the pandemic affected the labor market last year. In March and April of 2020 alone, more than 20 million workers lost their jobs, with many of them remaining out of work for months or longer. The economy was clearly crashing, and then, very tentatively, started to ascend earlier this year.  

While we may have thought that was the end of it, we’re seeing it was only the beginning of the pandemic’s effects on our economy. Somehow, within a year’s time, the leverage shifted drastically from employers to employees. In fact, I recently read a Washington Post article reporting that a record number 4.3 million people quit their jobs in the month of August alone.   

The Whys of the Resignation Letter 

One of the things that struck me most is that over the past twenty years, when we’ve experienced higher numbers of employees resigning, there was also higher confidence in a very strong economy, providing the cushion most people need to risk the security of their regular paycheck. It typically does not happen in a volatile and unpredictable economy or during challenging times fraught with unknowns.  

It made me wonder how we went from millions of people out of work, scrambling to find any job to now 2.9% of the workforce leaving those jobs in under a year. It seems that when the pandemic shook our mindsets in countless ways, it completely revamped how we view our jobs, or lack thereof. And questions abound – Is it that there are other opportunities out there, with better pay? Is pay no longer as prioritized because people are searching for something more fulfilling? Are people more restless now?  

There are indications that it is some combination thereof. This is coupled with the fundamental shift in employees’ thresholds for what they will, and will not, deal with as it relates to work. Most have become accustomed to working remotely, and as such, are not as willing to partake in stressful commutes or long hours. Others are taking a more scrutinizing look at what they are being paid compared to what they feel they are worth. Still others continue to have direct pandemic related issues, such as concerns over safety, healthcare, and childcare for their children. Whatever the reason for the shift, the data demonstrates an abundance of confidence among employees and stronger bargaining positions overall. 

Additionally, the employees that continued to be employed last year, who often worked with a skeleton team (or no team at all) are completely and utterly burnt out. For a year, they carried not only their own weight, but the weight of their absent team members, trying desperately to help sustain their company in any way they could. They’re exhausted. And they want (and quite frankly, deserve) to be appreciated. Unfortunately, some employers haven’t handled those situations post-pandemic as well as they should have, causing those loyal employees to search for greener pastures where they will be appreciated.  

Is It a Matter of Supply and Demand? 

Regardless of the reason though, there were a reported 10.4 million job openings at the end of August. And plainly, that’s a lot of leverage for employees looking for “something else.” Maybe it all comes down to Economics 101 – Supply and Demand. The supply of well-paying jobs is outnumbering the unemployed, and employees are, whether consciously or unconsciously, reevaluating their options.

One thing is for sure – we haven’t seen the full effects of the pandemic on the workforce yet. It remains to be seen when the leverage will balance out, causing more stability. In the meantime, many employers are reacting with increased pay to try to find and retain qualified candidates. They are also (or should be) investing in retraining and skill analysis for their employees, who need new skills to work in the hybrid model for which so many employers are opting. 

Barker Associates has extensive experience in helping corporations shift and maintain alignment with the changing needs and requirements of the economy. If you need assistance, or have any other questions, please click here to schedule a 30-minute consultation at a rate of $100.  

The Pandemic’s Larger Impacts on Financial Reporting

The Pandemic’s Larger Impacts on Financial Reporting 
It’s About Much More than a Loss of Revenue 

Mindy Barker | Barker Associates

Many people incorrectly assumed that the pandemic’s only true effect on a business’s financials was a loss (albeit often significant) of revenue. And while that assumption is not even necessarily true of every business (many did very well), Covid-19 impacted much more—not just financial performance, but also position, cashflow, and balance sheet accounts. There have been impairments to goodwill and other intangibles, effects on inventory, a change in how and when audits are conducted, and impacts to overall company strategy and goals. And these impacts are especially challenging for a company in the growth phase. 

If your company is in the growth phase, it’s crucial to think about your options, understand your needs and, more significantly, how they have changed since the pandemic, what numbers are required, and to develop a new strategy. Companies in the growth phase are experiencing positive cash flow. With this increase in cash, they have the ability to repay debt, and are in a better position to seek additional capital from investors to expand their market reach. However, if the CFO hasn’t been carefully monitoring the pandemic’s impact on all aspects of the company’s financials, they likely don’t have their reporting in order to even approach potential investors.  

Changing Financial Needs Means Increased Financial Monitoring 

We learned fairly quickly in the beginning of the pandemic that liquidity is key to keeping a business from closing its doors in a crisis. The question that plagued many was how to increase liquidity with revenue decreasing? But those CFOs were often only considering pre-pandemic needs and observations, not the changing needs of the company in the midst of the pandemic. Auditors have noted that many accounts, including sales, inventory, and bad debt have been affected, as well as production and distribution. 

First, these changing needs require a change in financial monitoring. Cash flow projections and other assumptions used to measure financial instruments pre-pandemic should be adjusted to reflect your company’s new reality. Remember that a majority of businesses have been affected in one way or another, but if that results in their lack of ability to pay you, you’re going to incur additional credit and liquidity risks, increased bad debt, and write-offs.  

Cash Flow 
A careful analysis of your company’s cash flow can help. Some questions to consider about revenue include: 

  • Are accounts receivable being paid? 
  • Are past due accounts being followed up on? 
  • Are late payment fees and interest being charged to customers (your money should not be free)? 
  • Do you need to offer pre-payment discounts? 
  • Should you look at retainers/deposits? 
  • Do you have the capability of setting up auto-payments? 

Of course, we can’t consider cash flow without considering expenses. And while there will be a decrease in some, there will be an increase in others. At a minimum, consider the following questions: 

  • How have your office needs changed? 
  • Do you have the ability to downsize?  
  • How much are you saving due to decreased meal and travel expenses?  
  • Where are these savings being utilized? 
  • How much more are you spending on technology expenditures to maintain communications with staff and customers/clients?  

Balance Sheet Accounts 

Additionally, other balance sheet accounts have also been affected. One issue that warrants attention if you plan to seek outside funding is inventory needs and accessibility. With productivity and supply chains being disrupted, it may be difficult to allocate costs to inventory. There is also the issue of inventory that cannot be delivered because of travel restrictions. This also plays a significant role in the larger economic impact of decreased supply and increased demand, resulting in higher prices going forward. 

Goodwill, post-retirement plans, and internal controls are other accounts/issues that require an in depth look at your financials and a pivot in business strategy, as we slowly climb out of this pandemic.  

If you’re still waiting for things to get back to “normal,” and analyzing your financials based on pre-pandemic assumptions, you are not doing your business justice. You may think you have enough cash on hand or that expenses are timely being paid, but without meticulous monitoring and a true long-term plan based on our new reality, you cannot forecast or grow to the next level. 

This can be overwhelming. But pivoting in your financial planning and forecasting is necessary. Barker Associates has extensive experience in financial statement analysis, plans, and forecasts. If you need assistance, or have any other questions, please click here to schedule a 30-minute consultation at a rate of $100.